Celebrating 300 years

Children’s ward gets new nebulisers

Six nebulisers were presented by local Freemasons to the Children’s Ward at the Leicester Royal Infirmary via the Asthma Relief Charity by Leicestershire and Rutland PGM David Hagger.

Nebulisers convert liquid medication into aerosol droplets suitable for inhalation, using compressed air to enable patients to breathe more easily.

Each nebuliser will help 150 children over its six-year life. Members of Grey Friars Lodge, No. 6803, which meets in Leicester, also donated £1,400 to the Leicestershire Royal Infirmary Children and Young People’s Cancer Unit to provide play equipment and materials together with updating medical equipment.

Breathing easier

Six nebulisers were presented by local Freemasons to the children’s ward at the Leicester Royal Infirmary via the Asthma Relief charity

The presentation was made at a special event held at Freemasons’ Hall, Leicester on the 28th April 2016 hosted by the Provincial Grand Master of Leicestershire and Rutland RW Bro David Hagger.

Nebulisers are devices that converts liquid medication into aerosol droplets suitable for inhalation, using compressed air, thus enabling patients to breathe more easily. Each nebuliser will help 150 children over a six-year life.

Dhiraj Vara, Clinical Investigations Manager, said: 'On behalf of the Trust and the children's ward thank you to the Leicestershire and Rutland Freemasons. There is always a shortage of nebulisers on the wards so this will certainly help provide those therapies and therefore they are going to make a big difference.'

Members of the Grey Friars Lodge No. 6803, which meets in Leicester, also donated a total of £1,400 to the Leicestershire Royal Infirmary Children and Young People’s Cancer Unit to provide play equipment and materials together with updating medical equipment.

Kamlesh Mistry, Community and Events Fundraising Manager at Leicester Hospitals Charity, said: 'Thank you to the Grey Friars Lodge for raising a fantastic amount. The Children’s Cancer Unit at the Leicester Royal Infirmary really appreciate the money, so thank you from the kids, young adults, staff, and everyone on the wards.'

David Hagger said: 'I’m proud and delighted that the Leicestershire and Rutland Freemasons have been able to make a contribution to society by supporting the Leicester Royal Infirmary particularly helping many sick children and young people in the local community.'

Friday, 04 December 2015 05:48

Granite Lodge balloon race reaches Sweden!

During the summer barbecue held by Granite Lodge No. 2028 at the home of W Bro Mark Stewart-Halford, guests were encouraged to purchase a helium balloon which would be set free with a tag attached asking the finder to contact the lodge via its website.

Guests old and young were eager to try their luck and keen to see how far the balloons would go.

After the barbecue, results started to come in of balloon sightings, starting in Lincolnshire and then all the way out to Belgium in the North Sea.

Nothing however prepared the lodge to expect the farthest distance travelled, over 1,000 miles to Kullaberg in Sweden where a local diver, Mr Ian Fernheden spotted one of the balloons underwater on one of his dives. The moment the diver found the balloon underwater can be seen here: Granite Lodge balloon find.

The day raised over £1,000 for the Master's chosen charity, the Bone Marrow Transplant Unit at Leicester Royal Infirmary.

Leicester's War Memorial

On the north side of the Holmes Lodge Room in Leicester's Freemasons’ Hall stands a war memorial tablet which details the names of the brethren who served in the Great War (WW1), and the seven Leicestershire and Rutland brethren who gave their lives in that conflict. Often the brethren attending meetings in that fine space give it scarcely a second glance, but how did it come to be there and what can we find out about those seven brethren?

An appeal was launched in 1919 for subscriptions towards a Freemasons’ War Memorial which 'should take the form of a substantial fund for the Leicester Royal Infirmary (LRI) and a memorial of some kind in connection with the Masonic Temple'.

The appeal raised over £5,500 (equivalent to £750,000 in today's money) of which £5,000 was for the LRI (new Orthopaedic Department) and the remainder for a memorial tablet to record the names of the seven brethren who fell in the war, plus those brethren who served in His Majesty’s Regular and Territorial Forces.

A question has been raised whether there are other Leicestershire and Rutland masons who died in action or as a result of wounds, who are missing from the memorial. The problem is that many of the records were bombed in the Second World War – many being totally destroyed and what remains at Kew are referred to as 'the burnt records'.

So next time you are in Freemasons’ Hall, please do go into the Holmes Lodge Room and look at the memorial tablet, and spare a thought for those brethren in general who served their country 100 years ago.

A detailed paper has been written about the tablet in the Holmes Lodge Room (with detailed notes on the seven brethren) by W Bro Jonathan Varley and has been published in the 2012-13 Transactions of the Lodge of Research No. 2429, which are available from the lodge secretary.

The Lodge of Research seeks to exchange opinions with Freemasons throughout the world, and to attract and interest brethren by means of papers on the historical and symbolic aspects of masonry. It meets on the fourth Monday in November, January and March at London Road. Contact the secretary for further details of membership or visiting.

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